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Bachelor in Education (Primary) Year Two Module Listings

Module Code:ED8206ECTS Credits:5

Overview

Language Study/Teaching English as an Additional Language:

This module takes a broad approach to language studies, in that it draws upon multi-disciplinary perspectives in order to examine first language acquisition and second and additional language learning. The module contains a specific focus on teaching English as an additional language (EAL) and on Gaeilge. The content incorporates sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics and socio-political discourse, while also aiming to improve students’ pedagogical skills in relation to language education.

Teaching Through the Medium of Irish:

There are a significant number of Gaeltacht and all-Irish schools in existence and there is a significant number of students who wish to teach through the medium of Irish. Latest research shows the value of teaching other subjects through the medium of Irish in schools where Irish is the second language. The Teaching Council recognises that it is necessary for every student teacher to complete a module on “Teaching through the Medium of Irish: Language and Culture”.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

Language Study:

  • Identify the developmental stages involved in children’s language acquisition (first, second and additional languages)
  • Identify the elements of language (Phonology, Semantics, Grammar and Pragmatics) and trace the progression of their use in a typically developing child 
  • Describe and critically analyse major theories on how language acquisition and additional language learning takes place and apply theoretical perspectives to the practice of teaching in English, as Gaeilge and with EAL 
  • Analyse the centrality of language in the Irish Primary School Curriculum, particularly in the English and Gaeilge curricula but also in a cross-curricular sense, through exploration of the concepts of language as a developmental process (Bloom, 1998), language as a cognitive tool (Vygotsky, 1978; Boroditsky, 2006) and language as a facilitator of emotional expression (Bloom, 1998; Freud, 1999) 

English as an Additional Language:

  • Demonstrate understanding of and reflection on models of language education
  • Describe and critically analyse major theories on how language acquisition and additional language learning take place and apply theoretical perspectives to the practice of teaching in English, as Gaeilge and with EAL
  • Examine a range of approaches to literacy education and oral language development for use in the multi-ethnic/multilingual classroom
  • Analyse the place of minority and heritage languages in the multi-ethnic/multilingual primary school from different perspectives along the assimilationism/multiculturalism continuum 

Teaching through the Medium of Irish:

  • Give an informed description of the Gaelscoil System 
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the circumstances of Gaeltacht schools 
  • List the support organisations for Irish-Medium Education and explain their roles 
  • Identify and source teaching and learning aids for Irish-Medium Education and explore the most realistic possibilities for teaching other subjects through the medium of Irish in schools where Irish is the second language
  • Recognise the challenges and the controversies surrounding Irish-Medium Education, express opinions about them and take a stance in regard to them
  • Give an informed description of the Irish-Medium Preschool System and Aistear

Method of Assessment

Reflective Journal (3,000 words)

Module Code:ED8208ECTS Credits:5

Overview

In this module, the ‘foundational’ approach to the disciplines of psychology and sociology is, as recommended, reconfigured (Darling-Hammond, 2006; Conway et al., 2009) to promote students’ integrated learning across these disciplines, their curriculum methods and other coursework and their classroom practice. Students are introduced to specific theories of each discipline and to their interrelationships, so that they might develop appropriate perspectives that enable them to better understand the dynamics and issues of school life and successful classroom pedagogy.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Critically analyse the implications of specific psychological and sociological theoretical perspectives for education
  • Articulate, from an informed perspective, concepts of ability / knowledge / learning and how these might impact on practice as a teacher
  • Identify the multitude of psychological and sociological factors interacting with, and impacting on, motivation and learning  
  • Draw on psychological and sociological insights gained with respect to the dynamics and issues of school and classroom life, to develop an understanding of potentially successful pedagogical strategies

Method of Assessment

Group Project and Presentation

Module Code:ED8210ECTS Credits:5

Overview

This module introduces students to an understanding of difference and diversity from a human rights perspective. It includes Special Educational Needs, and Development Education and Intercultural Education. There is now a strong emphasis on creating inclusive learning environments that can cater for pupil diversity (Griffin & Shevlin, 2011). This is reflected in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), the Education Act (1998), the EPSEN Act (2004), the Irish Aid White Paper (2006), and the Intercultural Education Strategy (2010). Consequently all teachers are expected to become capable in the design and delivery of a broad balanced curriculum that includes all pupils and which incorporates a social justice and global perspective.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Critically examine the concept of inclusion from a human rights perspective (Osler and Starkey, 2010; Waldron & Ruane 2010)
  • Demonstrate the attitudes necessary for successful engagement with inclusive practice (Murray & O'Doherty, 2001; Allum, Lowe & Robinson, 2008)
  • Demonstrate understanding of the wide spectrum of learning difficulties and Special Educational Needs, and the range of in-school provision (personnel, strategies, resources) available to cater for pupils' diverse learning needs
  • Identify a range of opportunities for integration of a social justice perspective into the primary school and classroom (Ruane, Horgan & Cremin, 1999; Gannon, 2002; Garforth, Hopper, Lowe & Robinson, 2006; Allum, Lowe & Robinson, 2010)
  • Explain and critically analyse some of the causes of global poverty (Sachs, 2005; Regan, 2008) and incorporate an awareness of development education and intercultural education into their classroom planning and practice (Ruane, Horgan & Cremin, 1999; Gannon, 2002; Coghlan & Morris, 2005)
  • Appraise a range of models for differentiated classroom practice
  • Employ a limited number of differentiation interventions for enhancing learning in the classroom (Westwood 2010)

Method of Assessment

Oral questioning

Module Code:ED8202ECTS Credits:5

Overview

English Methods (2.5 ECTS Credits)

As language is central to learning and English is the medium for most learning in the Primary School Curriculum, the importance of literacy in English cannot be overstated. Children at senior class levels need to develop literacy skills in the three language strands of oral language, reading and writing. Pre-service teachers need guidance and instruction in understanding how these skills are developed and in learning methodologies for teaching in these areas.

Irish Methods (2.5 ECTS Credits)

Gaeilge is a living language of communication. It is part of our heritage and the most distinctive part of Gaelic culture. The learning of Gaeilge enables the child to make closer contact with that culture. Gaeilge is the national language of Ireland, it has constitutional status and in general every primary school child must learn Gaeilge.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

English Methods:

  • Plan a series of English language lessons for senior classes (5th & 6th) in accordance with the principles of the Primary School Curriculum (1999)
  • Describe appropriate teaching methodologies for the teaching oral language, reading and writing as appropriate to the senior classes in primary school
  • Describe and illustrate the literacy-related knowledge, strategies, skills, and attitudes that children will need to draw on in order to meet the oral language, reading and writing demands of the English Curriculum (5th & 6th classes)
  • Describe the processes by which literacy learners analyse and respond to texts and bring a critical awareness to reading and writing
  • Undertake short term and long term planning for school placement and plan a unit of work for instruction in oral language, reading and writing for this placement

Irish Methods:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to teach Gaeilge as a living language of communication in the senior classes as it is recommended to do that in the 1999 Curriculum
  • Demonstrate a deeper knowledge of the Curriculum for Gaeilge and explain what is entailed with a communicative approach in the senior classes
  • Use appropriate strategies and teaching methods to cater for communicative needs in communicative situations 
  • Explain the importance associated with enjoyment and positive attitude and outline the ways in which Gaeilge can be promoted informally 
  • Undertake short term and long term planning for school placement and plan a unit of work for a week under the umbrella of the themes and topics of the Gaeilge Curriculum, write a Gaeilge lesson plan and demonstrate the importance of language functions and periods in a communicative lesson, demonstrate how to integrate the strands of the Gaeilge Curriculum and how to undertake appropriate assessment
  • Plan and teach a lesson in another curricular area through the medium of Gaeilge

Methods of Assessment

English Methods:

1.5 hour exam

Irish Methods:

1,500 word assignment 

Module Code:ED8203ECTS Credits:5

Overview

This module is divided into two learning areas (1) Physical Education (PE) and (2) Social, Personal and Health Education (SPHE). It is based on a broad philosophy of health that encompasses all aspects of a child’s well-being, with a particular focus on physical, social, mental, and spiritual health. It is concerned with developing students’ knowledge and understanding, skills, values and attitudes that are central to quality PE and SPHE programmes for children. Student teachers will be encouraged to focus on the role they play as they promote:

  • The physical, social and emotional growth and development of pupils in both learning areas
  • The adoption of active, healthy lifestyles through informed decision making which leads to effective and responsible action
  • An understanding of the value of self and others and the development of positive interpersonal relationships
  • Participation in regular and varied physical education experiences, which provide the foundation for a lifelong commitment to valuing and leading a physically active lifestyle
  • The systematic and explicit teaching of personal and social skills to give students a basis for resilience and the resourceful management of their own lives

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Revise the rationale, nature and value of PE and SPHE in the primary school and compare and contrast these at different class levels
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of their responsibility as role models for active, healthy lifestyles
  • Design, implement and assess units of work (schemes) and longer term plans in PE and SPHE  
  • Perform/mimic participative (active learning) methodologies central to the organisation and management of PE and SPHE lessons
  • Recognise the skills required when teaching ‘sensitive’ areas in SPHE
  • Examine and critique the range of resources and equipment available for the teaching of PE and SPHE 
  • Use appropriate health and safety strategies in PE and SPHE lessons, underpinned by Child Protection guidelines 
  • Reflect on and debate contemporary research and current issues in PE and SPHE 
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of what it means to engage a whole school approach to PE and SPHE (a ‘Health Promoting, Active School’) 
  • Differentiate activities for children with Special Educational and other needs in PE and SPHE

Methods of Assessment

PE:

Group Assignment/Presentation

SPHE:

1.5 hour exam

Module Code:ED8212ECTS Credits:5

Overview

Social, Environmental and Scientific Education (SESE)

Social, Environmental and Scientific Education (SESE) seeks to examine and understand communities from the local to the global, their diverse heritages, their complex systems and how people and environments affect each other in the present and in the past. This area of study will continue to explore scientific, geographical and historical concepts and procedures relevant to the SESE curriculum and to the students’ own personal and professional development in the different curricular areas. The course will focus on practical experiences that will provide the necessary skills and pedagogical understandings that primary teachers will need in order to teach the three SESE subjects of history, geography and science successfully in various classroom settings, urban, rural and multicultural. There will be an increased emphasis on practical investigations incorporating fieldwork in different settings for all three subject areas. Areas of study include curriculum content, methodologies and approaches, integration and planning, assessment, resource planning and use of technology in teaching history, geography and science with a particular emphasis on the 5th of 6th classes of the primary school. The study of the Primary School Curriculum (1999) and the associated Teacher Guidelines will be the main focus of the course. The course will afford students the opportunity to continue to critically examine their own attitudes and beliefs in relation to the three subject areas together with effective strategies that will enhance pupils’ learning in social, environmental and scientific education.

Mathematics

This module is an extension of the first year course and builds on the concepts covered in second to fourth class. The small group workshop session structure of this course aims to facilitate exploration of the content of the Primary School Mathematics Curriculum in fifth and sixth classes. The workshops will also encompass the further development of lesson plans and an introduction to writing schemes for differentiation and assessment.

The focus of the workshops will be on exploring students’ own experiences and understandings of mathematical concepts and incorporating that learning into their first experiences of teaching mathematics to with young children. It will work on the development of enduring mathematical understandings in both students and children (Wiggins, G. & J. McTighe (1998). Understanding by Design. Ohio: Merrill Prentice Hall), through exploring key questions such as ‘Why do we measure things?’ or ‘What makes a computational strategy effective and efficient?’ building on the work completed in the First Year course.

Students will continue to use the backward design process (Wiggins & McTighe ibid) to inform their approach to both planning and assessment. Through engaging with this process they will explore what is worth being familiar with, what is important to know, and what constitutes enduring mathematical understandings in children. They will examine in greater detail examples of both teachers’ and children’s work and develop materials which can support their teaching of the fifth and sixth class curriculum.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

SESE

  • Demonstrate dimensions of subject matter knowledge, content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and curriculum knowledge in SESE (particularly for 5th-6th classes).
  • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the current curriculum documents and recognise the strands, strand units, skills and competencies that pupils should develop at each level in the primary classroom for each curricular area. 
  • Prepare and write lessons in SESE which demonstrate an increased awareness of the local and global concerns, and which incorporate a development education perspective appropriate to the primary school classroom 
  • Explore ways that various materials and resources, including the use of ICT, can be used effectively and safely in the classroom to create an active, engaging, learning environment 
  • Use diverse approaches to become a resourceful teacher and a thoughtful reflective practitioner in the subject areas of history, geography and science
  • Explore a range of different environments through fieldwork to support children’s learning in their own immediate local environment 

Mathematics

  • Describe clearly a selection of key concepts in primary mathematics (fifth and sixth class)
  • Demonstrate evidence of how to design effective learning activities in primary mathematics
  • Apply a variety of appropriate methodologies to mathematical content
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of appropriate formative assessment strategies in maths
  • Demonstrate ability to work collaboratively in the planning and teaching of mathematics

Methods of Assessment

SESE:

Group Presentation

Mathematics:

1.5 hour exam

Module Code:ED8204ECTS Credits:5

Overview

Educational drama, with its roots in dramatic play, fulfils children’s need to imagine and actively pretend (Baldwin, 2008) and explores the deepest level of the human condition (Wagner, 1999). It is a gateway to learning and affords ways of perceiving and knowing that are otherwise inaccessible (DES, 1999). This senior freshman module has a particular weighting on drama to empower the student with the knowledge and skills needed to implement process drama in a professional manner (Bloomfield & Childs, 2002). It situates the teaching of drama in the context of primary classroom and introduces a range of process dramas for senior classes followed by an analysis of the theoretical and practical principles which underpin it (Murphy & O Keeffe, 2006).

This module also examines the senior arts curricula for music and visual arts in light of pupil’s aesthetic and creative development. It extends their subject and pedagogical connoisseurship through participation, repertoire and critical, contextual and curriculum studies. The module explores assessment of the arts (drama, music and visual arts) and progresses their planning skills to devise imaginative and thematic schemes and integrated units of work (drama and visual arts).

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Design imaginative drama experiences for senior classes, informed by direct exploration and understanding of the senior drama curriculum
  • Express with originality, ideas, feelings and experiences through the arts
  • Respond to a stimulus and develop an idea using different arts modes 
  • Demonstrate understanding of the properties and possibilities of the visual elements across the visual arts strands
  • Reflect on the expressive character of compositions, performances and art works in a more informed and open manner
  • Make skilled and imaginative use of body, voice, environmental and instrumental sounds to express, create, compose and perform

Methods of Assessment

2 x Group Project Presentations (50%)

Individual Project (50%)

Module Code:ED8213ECTS Credits:5

Overview

As digital natives, it is widely held that 21st century students use technology in creative ways on a personal basis (Green & Hannon, 2007; Thomas & Seely Brown, 2011). However, at broad policy levels there are deep concerns that this fluid usage is not translating to education settings (ibid). Thus, an increasing body of literature foregrounds the importance of affording students the skills necessary to effectively and creatively integrate ICT into the classroom settings in order to enhance teaching and learning (cf. DES 2015; Kampylis, Law, Punie, Bocconi, Brečko, Han, Looi, & Miyake, (2013) for example, within the context of Inquiry Based Learning.

Inquiry as a theme of educational research has attracted considerable interest, particularly in recent years (Audet, 2005; Erickson, 2008; Lindfors, 1999; Parker, 2007). Inquiry can be seen as a process of seeking. It may take the form of a closed-ended search whereby specific answers are discovered to specific questions. Alternatively, it may take the form of an open-ended search, in which questions are formulated but answers are multiple or provisional or both. The exploratory nature of inquiry allows students to consider different ways of looking at ideas and issues, and to think creatively about problems that do not possess simple answers. Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) is the object of growing interest in a number of countries such as the UK, the US and Ireland in which there is a lively debate about pre-determined outcomes and teaching standards and standardised testing that are often contrasted with inquiry and discovery approaches to learning. Finally, it currently influences curriculum development and teaching approaches and methodologies in a number of recent innovative programmes to construct new models of teaching and learning [Pataray-Ching & Roberson, 2002; Sausele Knodt, 2010]. This has led to research and development of inquiry based curricula and the argument in support of IBL is being heard increasingly and recognised as an appropriate pedagogical approach.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Interpret and critically analyse the theoretical frameworks underlying technology and their use in education, particularly within an Inquiry Based Learning context [cf. TPACK Model (Mishra & Koehler, 2006)]. 
  • Evaluate and experiment with various educational software packages, hardware and other “kit” and demonstrate their application in an Inquiry Based Learning context
  • Understand the concepts of constructivism; different models of the process of inquiry; user-generated content, 21st century learners, digital natives, digital learning objects, peer digital learning, creative commons, copyright and publishing and understand how these concepts apply when using technology in the classroom
  • Experience emergent technologies and critically analyse their application to an Inquiry Based Learning environment
  • Create their own Inquiry Based Learning-focused digital resource 

Method of Assessment

Group Presentation

Module Code:ED8209ECTS Credits:5

Overview

In light of their unique position as generous expert and caring and moral person, this course seeks to sustain students as lifelong creative and innovative thinkers, and to make them cognisant of the long term impact that their dispositions and classroom practices can have on children’s learning and development. Students will be afforded opportunities for experiential learning, critical reflection and shared knowledge construction with respect to the roles that imagination and integration can have in innovative teaching and learning.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Articulate their understanding of theories concerning the transfer of learning, the integration of learning, higher order imaginative thinking and the aesthetic dimension of learning 
  • Design integrated and innovative units of work which align with curriculum requirements and emphases and which motivate, inspire and celebrate originality, risk taking and innovation 
  • Source and appraise appropriate resources in light of their integrative potential

Method of Assessment

Group Presentation (60%)

Individual Research Poster (40%)

Module Code:ED8207ECTS Credits:5

Overview

English

This course aims to build on the Year 1 module in further developing the students' literacy skills, their knowledge of the structure of written and oral language and their knowledge and appreciation of story and poetry. The module aims to engender in students an enthusiasm for story and poetry and a desire to share it with others.

Irish

Irish is both a language and a subject in the primary school. It is important, therefore, that the competence  of the teacher in Irish is attended to so that the teacher will be able to function through the medium of Irish informally and express himself/herself effectively which teaching Irish.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

English

  • Demonstrate an increased understanding of the knowledge underlying the instruction of written and oral language in primary schools
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the structure of written and oral language
  • Write fluently and accurately with appropriate use of the conventions of literary criticism/academic writing
  • Apply a general knowledge of story/poetry to analysis of specific stories/poems
  • Critically analyse and appraise a selection of stories/poems
  • Draw on secondary literature in their analysis of stories/poems

Irish

  • Show the way in which responsibility was taken for learning, show that learning outcomes were achieved, indicate the ways of learning he/she used, display the regular recording made of that learning, demonstrate care taken and worthwhile use that was be made of sources (dictionaries and grammar books) and internet sites for terms and accuracy 
  • Demonstrate the ways in which language awareness enhanced learning and the role played by cultural awareness 
  • Listen with understanding and give correct answers to questions 
  • Speak fluently and accurately with a broad range of vocabulary and with suitable richness of speech and proper pronunciation and discuss a picture, partake in a conversation at normal speed 
  • Understand and supply arguments
  • Read and understand a lot of short and long written texts, and read texts aloud with meaning and proper pronunciation 
  • Write freely and accurately in a range of genres
  • Critique a literary text and list references correctly 
  • Demonstrate basic grammatical accuracy in contexts relating to his/her personal life, professional life, in translations and in functional texts

Methods of Assessment

English:

1,500 word essay

Irish:

Written exam (1 hour 20 minutes)

Oral exam (10 minutes)

Module Code:ED8201ECTS Credits:10

Overview

Field experiences in teacher education programmes are excellent opportunities for pre-service teachers to learn to teach in complex and authentic learning situations. Sawyer (2006) posits that knowledge is now considered as ‘situated, practised and collaboratively generated.’ Indeed it is because of this that learning to teach through the practice of teaching while on school placement is a critical component of teacher education programmes (Furlong and Maynard, 1995).

At Senior Freshman stage, students should continue with observations and should have increased responsibilities for planning and teaching. Emphasis will be placed on inclusive practices and students will be required to engage with planning for and engaging in differentiated practices. Students will continue to engage in reflective practice during the placement. Students will be required to continue their personal journal recording their experiences of the placement.

Students will be required to set learning goals for themselves based on their reflections and learning from their Junior Freshman practice. This will form part of their teaching file.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Prepare schemes of work and employ a thematic approach to planning which is appropriate to the age and ability range of the pupils in the senior classes 
  • Prepare, teach and evaluate lessons of appropriate challenge and interest in the senior class range
  • Use meaningful appropriate resources, to include digital and creative technologies, and displays to support their teaching and pupil learning
  • Demonstrate appropriate teaching skills, building on Junior Freshman year to include inclusive practices, the use of a range of positive behaviour management strategies and differentiation, notably in relation to literacy
  • Demonstrate a commitment to inclusive practices, notably with children with Special Educational Needs
  • Demonstrate a wide range of effective communication skills which facilitate positive interaction in the classroom and throughout the school 
  • Organise and maintain a positive learning environment supporting child centred learning and holistic development 
  • Engage in professional discussions with class teacher, principal teacher, HEI tutor and other professionals in the classroom 
  • Develop their skills as a reflective practitioner and demonstrate an ability to reflect critically on his/her practice so as to inform that practice
  • Demonstrate a commitment to democracy, equality and social justice in their teaching 

Method of Assessment

School Placement