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Covid-19 (Coronavirus) Update

*Cliceáil anseo chun an leathanach seo a léamh i nGaeilge*

Information for semester 2

  • For students on fulltime courses, all face-to-face classes resume from Monday, 7 February.
  • Students are requested to take an antigen test once per week, ideally on the first day of the week and only attend on campus if the test is negative.
  • Continue to protect your own health and the health of others by wearing face masks and not attending campus if you have symptoms of COVID-19 or are close contact of a confirmed case.

Please check your e-mail at least once a day for updates regarding the current Covid-19 pandemic.

Public Health Measures

The symptoms of Covid-19 are

1. A cough

2. Shortness of breath

3. Breathing difficulties

4. Fever (temperature higher than 38C or 100.4F)

5. Loss or change to your sense of taste or smell

6. Fatigue

Who to inform if you test positive for COVID-19

Please let the lecturers whose classes you’ll be missing know and inform your personal tutor. You can then upload any documents/images to MAESTRO. You do not need to inform the Registrar’s Office.

If you are a close contact of COVID-19

If you are a close contact of a person that tests positive for COVID-19 (coronavirus), what you there's a chance that you may have COVID-19 too. Follow the advise on this page to lower the risk of spreading the virus. 

There is separate advice if your child is a close contact.

What close contact means

When you have been in close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19, you will receive a text from the HSE to let you know that you are a close contact.

You could have been in contact with a positive case: 

  • in your household (sometimes called a 'household close contact')
  • outside your household (sometimes called a 'non-household close contact' or 'community close contact')

The advice on this page is the same for both household and non-household close contacts but varies depending on your situation. 

What is a non-household close contact?

You are a non-house close contact if you and someone who had a positive PCR test have been within 2 metres of each other for more than 15 minutes in a total in 1 day. 

When someone tests positive for COVID-19, their close contacts include people they were in close contact within the:

  • 48-hour period before they developed symptoms
  • 24-hour period before their test, if they did not have symptoms

It does not include people they saw briefly and did not touch. For example, talking to someone for a few minutes more than 2 metres apart. 

 What is a household close contact?

You are a household close contact if you:

  • live or sleep in the same home as a person who has tested positive
  • use a kitchen or bathroom in shared accommodations with a person who has tested positive
  • are a sexual partner of a person who has tested positive

What to do if you are a close contact?

For all close contacts 13 and older, follow the advice below that matches your situation

Close contacts under 13 should follow this advice

Your situation

Follow the advice below that matches your situation. 

You will see the terms 'booster dose' and 'first round of COVIE-19 vaccination' mentioned. If you're not sure what they mean, read these explainers first:

What do 'booster dose' and 'first round of COVID-19 vaccination' mean?

Booster dose

A 'booster dose' is the extra does of COVID-19 vaccine used to give better protection to people who have already had their first round of COVID-19 vaccination. 

First round of COVID-19 vaccination

When we say 'first round of COVID-19 vaccination' we mean your dose 1 and does 2 if you got AstraZeneca, Moderna or Pfizer. Or your single dose if you got the Janssen vaccine. 

If you have a weak immune system, you should have been offered an 'additional dose' to give you better protection. This is because your immune system may not respond as well to vaccination. You will still need a booster dose after this additional dose. 

How long does it take COVID-19 vaccines to work?

For your booster does of COVID-19 vaccine it takes 7 days for it to work. 

For your first round of COVID-19 vaccinations it takes:

  • 7 days after your second Pfizter/BioNTech dose for it work. 
  • 15 days after your second AstraZeneca dose for it to work
  • 14 days after your second Moderna dose for it to work

14 days after the Janssen single dose for it to work. 

I got my first round of COVID-19 vaccination but no booster

Here's what you need to do if you are a close contact who got their first round of COVID-19 vaccination, but you have not had a booster dose.

There is different advice (lower down on this page) if you have tested positive for COVID-19 in the past 3 months. 

Testing

You need to do 5 antigen tests with 2 days between each test. 

If any of your antigen tests are positive, or if you start to develop symptoms, you need to self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a PCR test

Restricted movements and self-isolation

You need to restrict your movements (stay at home) for 10 days. Do this from when you were last in contact with the person who tested positive. If you do not know when this was, do this from when you get the close contact text message from the HSE. 

If any of your antigen tests are positive, or if you start to develop symptoms, you need to self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a PCR test.

I got my booster less than 7 days ago

Here is what you need to do if you are a close contact who had a booster dose less than 7 days before the close contact text from the HSE. 

There is different advice (lower down on this page) if you have tested positive for COVID-19 in the past 3 months.

Testing

You need to do 5 antigen tests with 2 days between each test. 

If any of your antigen tests are positive, or if you start to develop symptoms, you need to self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a PCR test

Restricted movements and self-isolation

You need to restrict your movements (stay at home) for 10 days. Do this from when you were last in contact with the person who tested positive. If you do not know when this was, do this from when you get the close contact text message from the HSE. 

If any of your antigen tests are positive, or if you start to develop symptoms, you need to self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a PCR test.

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, you need to continue to do your antigen tests and self-isolate (stay in your room) 

I got my booster more than 7 days before the close contact text.

Here is what you need to do if you are a close contact who had a booster dose more than 7 days before the close contact text from the HSE. 

Testing

You need to do 3 antigen tests over 7 days.

Do the:

  • first test as soon as you can get an antigen test
  • second test 3 days after your first test
  • third test on the 7th day

Watch a video on how to do an antigen test 

If any of your antigen tests are positive, you need to report your positive antigen test result online and list your close contacts. You do not need to do another antigen test. Do not book a PCR test.

You should also report negative antigen results online. This helps us learn more about antigen testing.

A negative antigen test does not mean that you do not have COVID-19.

If you have an invalid test result, do another antigen test.

Book antigen tests

Restricted movements

You do not need to restrict your movements.

Face Mask

Wear a medical or respirator face mask if you have to be around other people.

Do this for 10 days starting from when you:

  • last had contact with the person who tested positive, or
  • were told you were a close contact by the HSE

 Read about types of face masks and when to wear them

I got my first round of COVID-19 vaccination and had a positive PCR test in the past 3 months.

Here's what you need to do if you are a close contact who got their first round of COVID-19 vaccination and had a positive COVID-19 antigen or PCR test in the past 3 months.

If you had a positive COVID-19 antigen or PCR test since 1 December 2021, you do not have to restrict your movements. You do not need to get tested unless you develop symptoms.

 

Testing

You need to do 3 antigen tests over 7 days.

Do the:

  • first test as soon as you can get an antigen test
  • second test 3 days after your first test
  • third test on the 7th day

Watch a video on how to do an antigen test

If any of your antigen tests are positive, you need to report your positive antigen test result and list your close contacts. You do not need to do another antigen test. Do not book a PCR test.

You should also report negative antigen results online. This helps us learn more about antigen testing.

A negative antigen test does not mean you do not have COVID-19.

If you have an invalid test result, do another antigen test.

Book antigen tests 

Restricted movements

You do not need to restrict your movements.

 

Face Mask

Wear a medical or respirator face mask if you have to be around other people.

Do this for 10 days starting from when you:

  • last had contact with the person who tested positive, or
  • were told you were a close contact by the HSE

 

Read about types of face masks and when to wear them 

I have symptoms of COVID-19

Here is what you need to do if you have symptoms of COVID-19. Everyone needs to do this if they have symptoms, including close contacts. 

Follow this advice even if you had your first round of COVID-19 vaccines, a booster, or had a positive PCR test in the last 3 months. 

Testing

You will need to get tested for COVID-19

Find out what type of COVID-19 test you need to do

Restricted movements and self isolation

you need to self-isolate (stay in your room)

You should start self-isolating as soon as you notice symptoms of Covid-19. 

How long you need to self-isolate depends on the results of your test.

Find out what to do if you get a:

Face Mask

Wear a medical or respirator face mask unless you are alone.

Do this for 10 days starting from when you:

  • last had contact with the person who tested positive, or
  • were told you were a close contact by the HSE

If you are self-isolating, you should stay in your room and avoid contact with other people.

If you end self-isolation after 7 days, it's important to continue to wear a medical or respirator face mask for 3 days after ending self-isolation when you are with other people.

Read about types of face masks and when to wear them

 

 

I have not had my first round of COVID-19 vaccination

Here is what you need to do if you are a close contact and you have not had your first round of COVID-19 vaccination. Do this even if you tested positive for COVID-19 in the past. 

Here's what you need to do if you are a close contact who got their first round of COVID-19 vaccination, but you have not had a booster dose.

There is different advice (lower down on this page) if you have tested positive for COVID-19 in the past 3 months. 

Testing

You need to do 5 antigen tests with 2 days between each test. 

If any of your antigen tests are positive, or if you start to develop symptoms, you need to self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a PCR test

Restricted movements and self-isolation

You need to restrict your movements (stay at home) for 10 days. Do this from when you were last in contact with the person who tested positive. If you do not know when this was, do this from when you get the close contact text message from the HSE. 

If any of your antigen tests are positive, or if you start to develop symptoms, you need to self-isolate (stay in your room) and get a PCR test.

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, you need to continue to do your antigen tests and self-isolate (stay in your room)

Read when you can stop self-isolating

I know I am a close contact but I have not been contacted by the HSE yet.

If you do not have symptoms, restrict your movements (stay at home). You will get a text message with a link to a website where you can provide your details. When you have done that, you will get a text message with information about tests. 

If you had a positive COVID-19 antigen or PCR test since 1 December 2021, you do not have to restrict your movements. You do not need to get tested unless you develop symptoms.

PCR test results

Follow this advice if you get a:

 I don’t see my situation here

If you are a close contact but you cannot see advice that matches your situation on this page, follow this advice.

This could be if you had:

  • no COVID-19 vaccination
  • your booster less than 7 days ago
  • your first round of COVID-19 vaccination but tested positive more than 3 months ago

 Testing

You need to do 3 antigen tests over 7 days.

Do the:

  • first test as soon as you can get an antigen test
  • second test 3 days after your first test
  • third test on the 7th day

Watch a video on how to do an antigen test

If any of your antigen tests are positive, you need to report your positive antigen test result and list your close contacts. You do not need to do any more antigen tests. Do not book a PCR test.

You should also report negative antigen results online. This helps us learn more about antigen testing.

A negative antigen test does not mean that you do not have COVID-19.

If you have an invalid test result, do another antigen test.

Book antigen tests

 

Restricted movements

You need to restrict your movements (stay at home) for 7 days.

Do this from the date you:

  • last had contact with the person who tested positive, if you know this, or
  • were notified by the HSE that you are a close contact

Face Mask

Wear a medical or respirator face mask when you are around other people.

Do this for 10 days starting from when you:

  • last had contact with the person who tested positive, or
  • were told you were a close contact by the HSE

 

Read about types of face masks and when to wear them

 

 

PCR test results

Follow this advice if you get a:

Living with someone who is a close contact or may have COVID-19

Here is some situations you might be in if you are living with someone who is a close contact or may have COVID-19.

If you live with someone who is restricting their movements.

If you live with someone who is restricting their movements, you do not need to restrict your movements.

 

If you live with someone who has symptoms of COVID-19

Follow this advice if you live with someone who has symptoms of COVID-19.

Restricted movements and self-isolation

You need to restrict movements (stay at home). Do this even if you completed your first round of COVID-19 vaccination, got a booster, or tested positive in the past.

If their PCR test is negative, you can stop restricting your movements and return to your normal activities.

If their PCR test is positive, you will become a close contact and should continue to restrict your movements. Follow the advice on this page for close contacts that matches your situation.

Testing

You don't need to do any tests while you're waiting for their test result to come back.

If their PCR test is negative, you won't need to do any tests.

If their PCR test is positive, you should follow the testing advice on this page for close contacts that matches your situation.

If you have symptoms

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 you need to:

If you live with someone waiting for PCR test results.

Follow this advice if you live with someone waiting for PCR test results.

Restricted movements and self-isolation

You need to restrict your movements (stay at home) if you live with someone who has symptoms of COVID-19 and is waiting on a PCR test result. Do this even if you completed your first round of COVID-19 vaccination, got a booster, or tested positive in the past.

If their PCR test is negative, you can stop restricting your movements and return to your normal activities.

If their PCR test is positive, you will become a close contact and should continue to restrict your movements. Follow the advice on this page for close contacts that matches your situation.

Testing

You don't need to do any tests while you're waiting for their test result to come back.

If their PCR test is negative, you won't need to do any tests.

If their PCR test is positive, you should follow the testing advice on this page for close contacts that matches your situation.

If you have symptoms

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 you need to:

 

If you are caring for someone who cannot self-isolate

It may not be possible for some people with COVID-19 to self-isolate. For example, a child, an older person or someone with a disability.

You and everyone else they live with need to restrict movements and take extra care to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. 

Read more about caring for someone who cannot self isolate. 

More in Close Contacts

Restricted movements and self-isolation

 

The Institute is reviewing the situation on a daily basis and will communicate with you through e-mail with updates. Please check your e-mail at least once each day.

    In the event that MIE has concerns about a Covid-19 case, the Institute will endeavour to communicate with you in three ways:

    • (i) By e-mail
    • (ii) Through the MIE website
    • (iii) By text message to the number we have on record for you. Now is a good time to check on MAESTRO that the mobile phone number we have for you is correct. If not, you can edit this yourself on MAESTRO.

    If you have any questions about this, please contact:

    The Registrar’s Office either by e-mail: registrars@mie.ie

     

    You can find out more about Covid-19 here: www2.hse.ie/conditions/coronavirus

     

    The Department of Further and Higher Education, Research Innovation and Science has provided information tor third level students: https://www.gov.ie/en/publication/bcd91-a-safe-return-to-on-site-further-and-higher-education-and-research/

    Travel

    In relation to all travel, staff and students should follow advice given by the Department of Foreign Affairs: https://www.dfa.ie/travel/travel-advice/coronavirus/

     We are monitoring the situation and will update the MIE community as necessary.  The health and well-being of our staff and students is paramount.

    Further information:

    You can keep up to date with latest news via the Health Protection Surveillance Centre website, particularly their FAQ section: https://www.hpsc.ie/a-z/respiratory/coronavirus/novelcoronavirus/

    Advice from the Department of Foreign Affairs: https://www.dfa.ie/travel/travel-advice/coronavirus/

    Advice from Trinity: https://www.tcd.ie/about/coronavirus/ 

    Advice from the DES: https://www.education.ie/en/The-Department/Announcements/information-for-schools-preschools-and-third-level-institutions-on-the-coronavirus.html